Workshops

Situating Urban Screens and Public Media Art in Asian Cities: Singapore, Seoul and Hong Kong

Date & Time 

Friday, June 25  | 9:00-14:00 CEST / 15:00-20:00 GMT

 

Description

This workshop gathers a group of international scholars, curators and media artists to share emergent practices and research of situated urban screen and public media art in three Asian megacities that have undergone rapid economic, urban and cultural development since the 1997 Asian financial crisis: Singapore, Seoul and Hong Kong.  Workshop participants will engage in discussion with the invited speakers on the themes, challenges, and provocations that will emerge from this session.

To date, there has been little scholarly attention in film, media and cultural studies given to the impact of urban media in public space in Asian cities. Having established economic stability up to and since the 1997 Asian financial crisis, Singapore, Seoul and Hong Kong continue to face intensified challenges of increased density attributed to urban redevelopment and growth, which has resulted in the rise of a sense of placelessness among inhabitants. As a result, recent initiatives have focused on making these cities livable and sustainable with Singapore, Seoul and Hong Kong named the top three Asian cities ranked as such (2018 Sustainable Cities Index). Livability includes embedding technology into everyday life, merging media and urban fabric in the interest of increased efficiency and usability. However, liveability also means creating cultural initiatives for urban place-making, now made more pertinent during a global pandemic.

These cities have initiated development of an arts and culture infrastructure, producing urban media art events in the interest of crafting a sense of place and culture. In such media embedded urban environments, what are cities communicating to us and what do we communicate back? How have these dynamics shifted as the result of the pandemic? An analysis of urban media in these cities would develop the foundations of a regional understanding of how screens and media art in urban environments impacts communication between cities and people in Asia.

 

Registration

To be announced

 

More information & Contact

Kristy H.A. Kang, Nanyang Technological University | khakang@ntu.edu.sg

Urban commons and participation in the context of the platform society

Date & Time 

Tuesday, June 29  |  10:00-15:00 CEST (2×2 hours)
Via Zoom 

 

Description

The growing technologization of urban spaces has prompted changes in the way we understand cities. While the use of technology in cities was originally focused on improving administrative workflows, the growing number of applications, systems, and datasets available or generated by cities, has led scholars to conceptualize the city as a platform where multiple actors participate and interact. In this context, we want to explore how such platforms have impacted or can be adopted for the management of commons, to generate new forms of decentralized participation and generate new dynamics between citizens, institutions and experts.

The workshop will present two main tracks, one focusing on the management of commons by local communities and the other dealing with new forms of participation or administration that have emerged or are still to be created in cities. During the workshop the participants will conceive new methods and tools that explore, for example, a) how communities and citizens can efficiently manage and share resources within a city; b) new forms of governance that allow for more decentralization; and c) propose and execute small or large urban transformations.

The results of the workshops tracks are expected to show new concepts for commoning and participation platforms. Based on the knowledge exchange and experience of the participants we will create and prototype future (digital) tools for urban commoning and decentralized forms of governance and participation.

The workshop is connected with a symposium on the same topic taking place on Monday, 28 June 2021. We recommend attending the symposium before joining the workshop (but it is not a precondition).

 

Signing up 

Click here to register

Deadline for participants’ expression of interest 31 May 2021

 

Workshop Organizers 

Gernot Tscherteu (realitylab GmbH),
Julia Jesella (realitylab GmbH),
Juan Carlos Carvajal B. (Media Architecture Institute)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, contact click here or send an email to office@realitylab.at 

 

 

Designing Restorative Cities

Date & Time 

Monday, June 28  |  16:00-19:00 CEST  |  08:00-11:00 Pacific Daylight Time 
Via Zoom 

 

Description

Our western cities are in a process of rapid densification. Obsolete industrial sites, waterfronts and other urban spaces are transformed, as is our urban fabric by infill with new high-density dwellings. Simultaneously, our cities anticipate actions to counter multiple ecological, economic, social (aging) and cultural grand challenges. Among other consequences, these processes of densification and interventions, exponentially weighs in on our shared public spaces. 

These public spaces need to facilitate more people (condominium high rises with small studio’s), more movements of people – and more ecologically. Especially in public space, a turn in the classic dichotomy between urban and rural might be manifested. Moreover, the social fabric, with its individualization, digital cocooning and hyper diversity needs public spaces to accommodate and stimulate social interaction and production as well as places to restore. The same goes for ecology, providing conflicting demands, putting a strain on the resilience of our cities.

The Concept of Restorativeness, derived from the field of Environmental Psychology and ecology, provides established knowledge, showing how any organism (including a system perspective) needs restoration regularly; physiologically, socially and ecologically. If we assume this to be true, the same concept offers a promising ‘lens’ to search for possible locations, nodes and systems – serving as ‘refuges’ or contra-mal in the densified urban fabric, offering city dwellers and or nature alike conditions to restore, consciously or unconsciously. 

Our workshop explores the transmission of this concept of restorativeness into the realm of urban design and architecture. How can it materialize on different levels of scale (from the ‘street corner’ to the network), ‘rewiring’ the urban infrastructure to build in urban resilience?

 

Signing up 

To be announced
Please note that this workshop is meant for students only.

 

Workshop Organizers 

Frank Suurenbroek (Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam),
Stefano Andreani (Harvard, Graduate School of Design),
Ben Hooker (ArtCenter College of Design)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, contact click here or send an email to Frank Suurenbroek [f.suurenbroek@hva.nl]. 

 

 

Visualizing Urban Happiness

Date & Time 

Friday, June 25  |  10:00-15:00 CEST
Platform: Zoom – link TBC

 

Description

Creating urban environments that cater to health and happiness is one of the biggest challenges faced by city planners, architects, designers, and policymakers. Yet, people who live in cities often lack the tools to inform decision-making processes that affect their quality of life. For this reason, they do not realize the potential of what they can bring into decision-making processes.

The objective of this workshop is to develop a blueprint for making city dwellers aware of and involved in changes to city design and governance. The workshop will be conducted as an immersive experience where participants from all over the world connect to harvest urban data and create a framework for happiness. The workshop will host 20 participants that will be divided into smaller groups of 3 to 4 people, who will collaborate digitally. 

The facilitators will engage with the participants by introducing the theme and providing them with tools and guidance throughout the workshop through a digital whiteboard (Mural) and zoom.
During the first part of the workshop, the teams will look into the relationship between people, places, and technology. The teams will venture outside, analyze their neighborhoods and gather urban data: the stories, photos and videos on their daily interactions with people, spaces and services. 

In the second part, participants will consider how the generated urban data can reflect happiness, and in turn, how showing that happiness (or lack thereof) in visual forms can affect the processes that would improve it. The workshop will lead to creating a visual framework and a digital toolkit for visualizing urban happiness.

 

Signing up 

Click here to register

 

Workshop Organizers 

UNSx | UNStudio
UNSx is UNStudio’s in-house innovation think tank and experience lab that is grounded in architectural, urban and product design, we research and experiment with new methodologies, technologies, processes and materials to design solutions for the shared human experience. UNSx supports UNStudio – an awarded global architectural design network with four full-service international offices in Amsterdam, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Frankfurt.

Squint Opera
Squint/Opera is a creative studio that brings together storytelling, media production, technology and design. We work with ambitious partners to communicate big ideas within the built environment, cultural institutions and green technology. With studios in London and New York, we work with an international portfolio of clients on a variety of content-drive and experiential projects. We blend creativity and technology to make big ideas happen; combining strategy with design, content and software.

 

 

Prototyping Next Generation Urban Interfaces

Date & Time 

Monday, June 28  |  11:00-15:30 CEST
Via Zoom

 

Description

Urban interfaces play an important role in the field of media architecture and smart cities. They enable citizens to access the digital layer of the city, to interact with urban applications, and to make more informed decisions about how they utilise the urban infrastructure. As the field of media architecture is diversifying, urban interfaces can also take on new forms, from advanced projections, robotic installations to bio-hybrid materials. These interfaces are complex to develop and in many cases difficult to test in real-life situations with users. This workshop invites people working in this field to submit new approaches for prototyping next generation interfaces in urban environments. The aim of the workshop is to take stock of the status quo and to inspire new approaches that have the potential to accelerate and support future work on designing and evaluating emerging urban interfaces.

 

Signing up 

Please send a 500-words abstract (in any format) to urbanxinterfaces@gmail.com

 

Workshop Organizers 

Alexander Wiethoff (LMU Munich)
Martin Tomitsch (University of Sydney)
Marius Hoggenmueller (University of Sydney)
Luke Hespanhol (University of Sydney)
Linda Hirsch (LMU Munich)
Beat Rossmy (LMU Munich)
Stewart Worrall (University of Sydney)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or email urbanxinterfaces@gmail.com

 

 

Augmenting Cities and Architecture with Immersive Technologies

Date & Time 

Thursday, June 24  |  TBA

 

Description

Immersive technologies such as augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and mixed reality (MR) have the potential to augment experiences within cities and the process of designing architecture. However, more work is needed to understand specific applications within these areas and how they can be designed. Therefore, the main aim of the workshop is to discuss and ideate use-cases for creating situated augmented reality (AR) and immersive applications for the purpose of making cities more engaging and to visualise architectural designs.

We welcome researchers and practitioners working on engaging experiences using AR and other immersive technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) within the context of enhancing architecture, public spaces and cities. Specific topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • The use of immersive technologies and applications in cities
  • Speculative designs, design fictions, and art projects;
  • Perspectives from literature
  • How immersive technologies and applications interact/enhance existing urban infrastructure/technologies (Public displays, Media facades, Buildings, Town squares, etc)
  • Visualising architectural designs in-situ and how such applications should be created
  • The effect of immersive technologies on culture and behaviour in cities

 

 

Registration & Submissions 

  • Paper Submission Deadline: 30 April 2021, 11:59 PM CET.
  • Notification of Acceptance (issued by): 14 May 2021.
  • Camera-ready version: 1 June 2021.

 

All papers will undergo a peer-review process by at least two expert reviewers to ensure a high standard of quality. Referees will consider originality, significance, technical soundness, clarity of exposition, and relevance to the workshop’s topics.

Research papers should be submitted electronically as a single PDF file through the EasyChair submission system: click here to submit

At least one author of each accepted paper must register for the conference and present the paper in the workshop.

 

Preparing Submissions

All workshop papers must contain original, previously unpublished, research work adhering the two publication types:

  • Full research papers (6 pages, including references), proposing new approaches, innovative methods and research findings. They should make substantial theoretical and empirical contributions to the research field.

  • Short research papers (4 pages, including references), presenting work in progress, lessons learnt, positions, emerging or future research issues and directions on human aspect challenges in the area.

Manuscripts should be formatted using the double-column IEEE conference format including all text, figures, tables, references, etc.

Submission templates are available here

 

Workshop Organizers 

Callum Parker
Sydney School of Architecture – Design and Planning | The University of Sydney
callum.parker(at)sydney.edu.au
 
Soojeong Yoo
Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies | The University of Sydney
soojeong.yoo(at)sydney.edu.au
 
Waldemar Jenek
Urban Informatics – QUT Design Lab | Queensland University of Technology | CSIROs DATA61
waldemar.jenek(at)hdr.qut.edu.au
 
Youngho Lee
Faculty of Computer Engineering | Mokpo National University
youngho(at)ce.mokpo.ac.kr

 

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here

 

Playful experience through interactive sonic design in virtual environments

Date & Time 

Saturday, June 26  |  10:00-13:30 CEST

 

Description

Sound plays a vital role in public spaces, yet studies on the effects of sound perception on crowd behaviours are limited. This workshop, organised by a team of scholars, sound artists, and media architects will address this through a combination of experts talk followed by an experiential activity where all participants will be invited to explore a series of sonic spaces within a virtual environment. The workshop aims to invite participants to explore the relationship between sound and engagement in public space and demonstrate how sound can affect the duration of stay and potentially enable or inhibit engagement in public space. Participants will be invited to experience a virtual sonic environment with the aim to inform designers and scholars about the possibilities that they can draw on when using sound as a medium for engagement in public space. Participants will be able to move freely between a series of spaces, each with a defined sonic environment. These sonic environments will change depending on the number of people in each space and the relationship between these spaces.

 

Signing up 

Click here to register

 

Workshop Organizers 

Xiaoduo Xu (Bartlett, University College London)
Qianhua Fu (Xinhua Zhiyun Technology Co.)
Busra Berber (Bartlett, University College London)
Ava Fatah gen. Schieck (Bartlett, University College London)
Hamed Alavi (Human-IST Institute, University of Fribourg)

 

 

More information & Contact

For more info, contact xiaoduo.xu.19@ucl.ac.uk

 

 

Experiments With The Imaginative Nature Of Responsive Fibre Concrete

Date & Time 

Tuesday, June 29  |  09:00-13:00 CEST
Via Zoom 

 

Description

In this workshop, participants are invited to test and explore the creative potential of responsive fibre concrete. This innovative technology developed by iart merges the digital and physical realms. Responsive fibre concrete forms a membrane that reacts to human proximity, with an ability to interact with its environment in diverse ways. Emerging from the concepts of Hypernature and Wabi-Sabi, the technology offers an interactive, dynamic, and situational system. It enables the creation of singular responsive surfaces at very varying scales: from a single wall, to a skyscraper facade. The workshop takes place virtually, but participants will have the opportunity to experiment with the physical prototypes in our studio. By exploring and engaging the different behavioural patterns, aesthetic qualities and effects are experienced, emergent scenarios are discovered.

 

Signing up 

Send an email to communication@iart.ch

 

Workshop Organizers 

IART (Valentin Spiess)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or email communication@iart.ch

 

 

Sensational Buoys

Date & Time 

Saturday/Sunday, June 26/27  |  15:00-18:00 CEST
Via Zoom 

 

Description

The workshop Sensational Buoys aims to explore the intersection between citizen sensing, toyification and monitoring urban waters. The participants will design and create the “Sensational Buoys”: small floating devices equipped with simple sensors and having a playful appearance. The buoys are playful devices to sense and visualize data about urban waters and are intended to raise awareness about the importance of monitoring our environment.

Citizen sensing is a way to promote awareness about the environment we live in and can be an empowerment tool fostering discussion and inspiring citizens to take action. Toyification is an approach to use toys and toy-like objects to support creativity, curiosity and exploration. The Sensational Buoys, then, will be characterised by toy-like aesthetics as a way to make them more enticing, so that they can engage participants and passersby in the activity and draw attention to the project.

The workshop will be divided in two parts: one dedicated to the speculative collaborative design and one dedicated to realisation and testing. The first part of the workshop will be dedicated to a free speculative exploration of how Sensational Buoys can be constructed and used. Facilitators and participants will discuss how citizen sensing can be applied to monitoring different kinds of urban waters. The second part of the workshop will be dedicated to the realisation of some Sensational Buoys made of recycled and craft materials integrated with a MicroBit board. The participants will create floating devices able to measure temperature near the water surface and display the collected information.

The workshop will be held online via Zoom. The participants can choose to participate in one or both parts of the workshop. 

 

Signing up 

To register your participation in Sensational Buoys Workshop, click here 

The deadline for subscription is on 25th May 2021.

 

Workshop Organizers 

Artur Vasconcelos Cordeiro (Universidade de São Paulo)
Jéssyca Hellen Lima Rios (Independent researcher)
Mattia Thibault (Tampere University)
Federico Sassi (Independent researcher)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or email artur.cordeiro@gmail.com

 

 

metaPLACE

Date & Time 

Session 1: Thursday, June 24  |  14:00 CEST, 08:00 EST, 22:00 AEST
Session 2: Optional and to be negotiated during the workshop (e.g. June 28 14:00 CEST, 08:00 EST, 22:00 AEST)

Workshop Duration: 2 hours with the option to negotiate a second two-hour session if participants would like this. A Padlet repository will be available for longer-term discussion, sharing data, feedback, and posting useful information and reflections.

 

Description

Could design collaboration, Smart urban media, and participatory design generate synergies that leverage the social wisdom of citizens for designing better urban futures through innovative approaches to placemaking? ‘metaPLACE’ research tests the theoretical assumption that participatory urban media (large and small interactive screens, façades, and devices) can act as a co-designed interface between diverse community, industry, and government stakeholders in urban environments. It assesses how interactive media installations can build engagement and dialogue between citizens and other city stakeholders about the places in which they live, work, and play. We explore how media interfaces can effectively help government and urban planners better understand and design more liveable environments to enhance the human and non-human experience of urban places.  

The metaPLACE co-design workshop at MAB20 is an opportunity for participants to identify local placemaking opportunities, propose design concepts, and think about installations that can integrate interactive media with sites, and site-specific purposes, based on their own local intelligence, local cultures, and local community and stakeholder needs.

 

Signing up 

Links to the registration form: tinyurl.com/y3yumjy8




 

Workshop Organizers 

Ian William McArthur
Associate Professor UNSW Sydney

Fang Xu
Associate Professor UNSW Sydney

 

 

From Glitter to $€£¥: Developing Business Cases for Media Architecture

Date & Time 

Thursday, June 24  |  TBA
Via Zoom

 

Description

Urban skylines increasingly sparkle and glitter in an attempt to create unique, memorable and welcoming urban experiences. The development coincides with the continuing replacement of advertising screens and billboards by innovative forms of media architecture that promote interactions between people and places. Along with this toolkit of urban lighting continually evolving, there is a need to better understand the strategies that convince decision-makers of the values, benefits and opportunities that media architecture creates for the ‘public good’. Here, financial return-on-investment considerations are often involved, similar to those in digital out-of-home advertising. But media architecture distinguishes itself through an ambition to fulfil cultural or societal purposes, where goals and ultimate economic benefit may be hard to quantify.

For this 3-hour workshop, we invite relevant media architecture professionals to work with us on developing an arsenal of practical tools that aid in articulating business goals of media architecture, balancing them with the medium’s predominant user experience goals. We will build upon our own practical experience in developing a business case for media architecture with an ambiguous cost recovery model that relies on carefully specified value streams instead of conventional income streams such as rental rates, advertising revenue and royalties.

Our workshop is primarily geared towards those who develop(ed) business cases for media architecture projects, or who have a vested interest in unpacking business goals of media architecture through the lens of culture and engagement. Our past work in this space has involved executives, designers and architects, academics and students, council representatives, and builders and contractors. A diverse participant pool is vital to the quality and depth of workshop outcomes.

 

Signing up 

Click here to register 
Registration Deadline: 1 June 2021

 

Workshop Organizers 

Niels Wouters (University of Melbourne),
Vanessa Pouthier (University of Melbourne),
Franz Wohlgezogen (University of Melbourne),
Kim Halskov (Aarhus University)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, contact niels.wouters@unimelb.edu.au

 

 

DIY & More-than-Human Media Architecture

Date & Time 

Tuesday, June 29  |  TBA
Via Zoom

 

Description

In recent years, research in the fields of media architecture and urban informatics have made calls to move beyond the human-centred city and towards a “more equitable multispecies city” (Van Dooren et al. 2012). Working towards future more-than-human cities, the design of hybrid digital-physical urban spaces – with an ethos of inclusivity and diversity – will require methods, tools, approaches, platforms, etc. to engage different communities, environments, and all kinds of nonhuman entities and creatures.

This workshop poses the following question: While considering different characteristics (such as gender, race, class, abilities, creed, digital skills, habitat, bio-systems), how can citizens engage in creating DIY and More-than-Human Media Architecture to actively shape their spaces and foster imaginaries of more-than-human urban futurity, all while being kinder towards our stressed and fragile urban ecology?

As a first step, DIY Media Architecture proposes that communities of experts support non-experts to create and design Media Architecture as active instigators of change in their own right. A possible strategy may lie in mobilizing allegories, entanglements, multispecies world-making, speculative prototyping, i.e. techniques to frame and engage more-than-human urban futures. This is positioned as empowering the less heard as taking charge of their digital-physical canvases throughout urban spaces and, as a next step, staking their and all creatures’ rights to the city.

The workshop will be conducted online on June 29th 2021. The workshop will provide the platform for discussions on alternative materials, platforms, strategies and tools for enabling DIY processes of the less heard in anthropocentric engagement. The workshop, further, encourages participants to bring prototypes, demos, videos and examples to broaden the conversation on DIY and More-than-Human Media Architecture. This will be collated towards two outcomes; 1) conceptual prototypes and 2) participants will be invited to co-author a publication. This is in keeping with MAB2020’s Themes & Issues of “Citizen’s Digital Rights”, “Playful and Artistic Civic Engagement” and “More-Than-Human Cities”.

 

Signing up 

Submission deadline for proposals: 30 April 2021 

Click here to apply

 

Workshop Organizers 

Kavita Gonsalves (Queensland University of Technology),
Greg Nijs (Université Libre de Bruxelles),
Waldemar Jenek (Queensland University of Technology),
Thomas Laureyssens (LUCA School of Arts),  
Jorgos Coenen (KU Leuven),
Glenda Amayo Caldwell (Queensland University of Technology),
Andrew Vande Moere (KU Leuven),
Marcus Foth (Queensland University of Technology)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or send and email to k.gonsalves@hdr.qut.edu.au 

 

 

Voiced Space: Re-signify City

Date & Time 

Thursday, June 24  |  19:00-21:00 CEST

 

Description

How to read the cityscape granting visibility and recognition to voices and histories previously silenced?
As we cross the city with our quotidian practices, it is often all too easy to overlook the palimpsest of contested past that surrounds us. It is necessary to create tools to re-read the city with awareness and intention.

When reading a territory with postcolonial awareness which voices are prioritized and which excluded?
How to read the cityscape considering global interactions and silenced power hierarchies?
And how is this present in the construction of the cityscape in its current conditions of segregation?


“Voiced Space: Re-signify City” focusses on fostering memory-making and processing through the development of innovative, participatory methods that do not physically touch the spaces involved. Such tools allow to critically engage with monuments, heritage sites and multi-layered urban landscapes. 

In the context of post-colonial processes and discourse, attention to the cityscape’s blindness to silenced memories is increasing, especially in relation to how different people experience the urban environment. There is the need to reckon with the polyphonic nature of cities, with their composite outlook which calls for an inclusive heritage.


“Voiced Space: Re-signify City” devices inclusive community tools and creative methods to reckon with unresolved historical wounds and controversial past. It also investigates solutions that circumvent the physical problems of the site by expanding the physical spaces with the support of virtual worlds, as such tools enable to address heritage sites and territories on the scale of the city and the landscape.


By using creative methods that lead to a change in perspective as well as hybrid technologies that ‘augment’ the urban landscape with unvoiced narratives, the city cracks open and can be re-read in its layered complex, controversial past.

What can we learn by looking at the city as a Voiced Space?

“Voiced Space: Re-signify City” aims at awakening the sensory apprehension of urban landscapes through the lenses of global, interconnected histories, reckoning with cityscape’s past and present and its unvoiced, stratified traces. This includes recontextualizing and re-reading the cityscape, exploring alternative systems capable of including other narratives beyond the dominant ones.

Engaging experts, activists, artists, and creative professionals “Voiced Space: Re- signify City” brings creativity into controversial situations. Next to integrating design research methods into the processing of heritage and territories, it investigates digital co-creative tools, bolstering innovative ideas on (the future of) heritage sites and memory-making in the Digital Age.

 

Signing up 

Please send an email to office@hybridspacelab.net with a short motivation paper describing your relation to the theme of “Voiced Space: Re-signify City” (max. 600 words)

Register before May 20th 2021

 

Workshop Organizers 

Prof. Elizabeth Sikiaridi and Prof. Frans Vogelaar
Hybrid Space Lab

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or send an email to office@hybridspacelab.net 

 

Image by Hybrid Space Lab, © Hybrid Space Lab

 

The Spaces Around the Screens: Towards a Critical Spatial Practice of Media Architecture

Date & Time 

Monday, June 28  |  14:00-16:00 CEST (8:00-10:00 EST, 22:00-00:00 AEST)
Check your time zone

 

Description

This online (ZOOM) workshop will focus on discussing and employing some of the concepts from my recently published book, The Building as Screen: A History, Theory, and Practice of Massive Media (Amsterdam University Press, 2020). We will discuss theoretical concepts from film, media studies, and design, such as critical spatial practice, data visualization, apparatus/dispositif, superimposition, and montage, as well as Casetti’s concept of the “relocation” of cinema, and then apply these theoretical frameworks to help us deconstruct and reconstruct the effects of embedded media in urban spaces in critical and creative ways. Our focus will be on the spaces around the screen as much as screens themselves. Here, we include the hybrid spaces created by the intersections of urban space, digital displays, and digital networks, large and small, communal and personal. Examples used will include projects that have won MAB awards in the past, as well as MAB 2020 nominees, with guest lectures from some of the creators (TBD). Locations in Toronto (the Ryerson Image Arts Building, the CN Tower, Yonge and Dundas Square) will also be explored in greater detail by the organizers in a pre-recorded video. The video will be viewed to participants during the workshop. Participants will be given worksheets to complete while watching the video, employing observational methods and reflective writing to help digest the theoretical concepts in context. Finally, workshop participants will work in small groups to propose a critical urban media intervention for a specific site of their choice based on their observations and theoretical knowledge gained during the workshop. The results of this design sprint will then be shared with the group.

This workshop should appeal to a wide range of interests and actors including academics, researchers, artists, urbanists, city planners, architects, technologists, and designers. Participants acquire theoretical and practical tools for deconstructing existing urban media environments in order to understand the affordances and power dynamics and subject positions created by the interplay of space and media. Following this, they will be able to test and transform the knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed in the workshop in a short design sprint. They will engage creative and collaborative energies, while allowing for the collective discussion, critique, and creation of new theories and hypotheses. 

 

Signing up 

Email david.colangelo@ryerson.ca

Register before June 1, 2021.

You will be sent a link to the ZOOM meeting once the schedule has been finalized.

 

Workshop Organizers 

Dave Colangelo, Patricio Dávila
Co-Founders — Public Visualization Studio, Toronto, Canada

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or contact david.colangelo@ryerson.ca 

 

Image Credits: Shadow! (2018), Public Visualization Studio

Subversive Citizen Manual for the More-Than-Human City

Date & Time 

Tuesday, June 29  |  09:30-15:30 CEST
Via Zoom

 

Description

As the city is becoming an ever more complex assemblage of human and artificial non-human entities, questions of relationships, rights and democratic values are becoming prominent. In particular, the growing presence of artificial entities we share our cities with and the less acknowledged presence of digital representation of ourselves (digital twins) we delegate part of our existence to, asks for addressing the controversial consequences of such urban innovation based on technological determinism. In this workshop, we will explore the design space of contestation within the more-than-human city, employing thing-centered-design techniques, as Interviews with Things and role-playing, to envision a set of subversive strategies creating a manual of subversive strategies to disengage or mingle with artificial agents in the smart city. These strategies will be collected in a provocative document: The Subversive Citizen Manual for the More-Than-Human City.

 

Signing up 

Call for position papers. Find more information on how to send your submission via subvercity.org/participate/

 

Workshop Organizers 

Maria Luce Lupetti (AiTech, Delft University of Technology),
Iskander Smit (Cities of Things Delft Design Lab, Delft University of Technology),
Iohanna Nicenboim (Connected Everyday Lab, Delft University of Technology),
Gijs Huisman (Food and Eating Design Lab, Delft University of Technology),
Eduard Fosch Villaronga (eLaw – Center for Law and Digital Technologies, Leiden University),
Viktor Bedö (Critical Media Lab Basel, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland),
Mick Jongeling (Hogeschool Rotterdam Business School, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences).


 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or send an email to submit@subvercity.org

 

 

Engaging with smart city controversies through a media interface

Date & Time 

Monday, June 28  |  10:00-12:00 CEST
Via Zoom 

 

Description

Smart cities involve datafied and contested forms of public space that require new frameworks to conceptualize, develop and evaluate them. In this workshop, participants will reflect on how (critical) design makes smart city controversies debatable, and stimulate collective imagination ad action. To this end, participants will engage with a media interface that utilizes smart city controversies to reflect on public values and ethics of responsibility. The workshop will consist of three steps: (1) engagement with the media interface, (2) debate on controversies and (3) reflection on desirable and (un)desirable smart city futures.

 

Signing up 

To sign up, click here

 

Workshop Organizers 

Julieta Matos Castaño (University of Twente)
Anouk Geenen (University of Twente)
Corelia Baibarac-Duignan (Utrecht University)

 

More information & Contact

For more info, click here or email j.matoscastano@utwente.nl

 

Image Credits: Photo by Ridhwan Nordin on Unsplash

 

The City as a License: Design, Rights and Civics in a Blockchain Society

Date & Time 

Thursday, June 24  |  14:00-18:00 CEST

 

Description

The goal of this workshop is to work towards a special issue / edited volume on the theme of The City as a License: Design, Rights and Civics in a Blockchain Society. We seek written and visual contributions that explore the opportunities and challenges as well as actual experiments and designs of Digital Ledger Technologies in civic contexts, from a perspective of urban governance, social justice and the ‘right to the city’. 

In the past few years, a number of authors have expressed the capabilities for blockchain to become the administrative backbone of civic economy, peer-to-peer and urban commons projects  DLTs are seen as technology that could further promote urban commons as systems of resource production, management and governance within communities that focus on use value rather than exchange value, and are thought to contribute to more inclusive, sustainable urban societies.

In these scenarios, DLTs are set-up as an administration, management and allocation tool for public and civic resources. However, these DLTs are more than just accounting tools. They have come to de facto govern the systems and communities that they administer, meaning that it becomes important to explore their effect on social dynamics and power relations.

In a half-a-day workshop, authors present their abstracts and discuss their themes, argument and research approach.

 

Signing up 

Prospective participants are invited to send in an abstract of around 500 words describing their envisioned contribution to the special issue.

  • Deadline for submissions is May 15th.
  • Notification of selected abstracts: June 1st. 

The workshop will take place online. Selections will be made by the organising committee / editors of the publication. 

Submissions are to be made through easychair. Click here to sign up!

 

Workshop Organizers 

Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences Civic Interaction Design Research Group & Institute of Network Cultures (Martijn de Waal, Gabriele Ferri & Inte Gloerich); Institute for Design Informatics, University of Edinburgh (John Vines & Chris Elsden).

 

More information & Contact

For more info, including an extended call for participation, click here.